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Helping companies optimize and improve the secure and accessible delivery, storage and presentment of customer communications

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IF YOUR organization is like most, you have several critical, disjointed workflow processes. Often, software that was modified 10 years ago is being used to fit the way work was done in the past, not the way it is being done today. This has led to disparate technology with its own unique and specific workflows. It has also created numerous process workarounds and employees with “tribal knowledge” who keep operations running smoothly. There is the unspoken truth that everything will come crashing to a halt if a piece of hardware seizes up, a software application crashes or certain employees resign taking their knowledge with them.

In the spring of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic erupted. Suddenly, we were faced with a new reality when it came to how we work. Reduced staffs were allowed in production print facilities or offices, but print operators had to socially distance from each other. Manual processes were considered risky because of reduced staff, albeit with the same volumes and SLAs.

David Zwang talks to Ernie Crawford, President and CEO of Crawford Technologies, about the evolution of the company. Founded 25 years ago, the company at that time was focused on helping organizations with the transition to then-new architectures like PostScript and PDF. Today, Crawford helps companies optimize workflows for transactional, direct mail, and commercial print.

The last six months have brought about changes to businesses, families and individuals in ways we never could have imagined. The current business climate has been concerning for many. In a recent study I read, 47% of respondents indicated a negative impact on company financials and a 39% negative impact on employee headcount. As we all know, the news is littered with stories of 100-year-old companies filing for bankruptcy.